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Django's watching my back(end)

Description

With the advent of new amazing front-end frameworks and the ever-increasing power of browsers and mobile processors, webapp users expect a dynamic, seamless user experience where page refresh is out of the question. We Pythonistas love Django for web development, but server-side template rendering is not cool anymore. What do? Use Django as a pure back-end.

In this talk, technologies, strategies and third-party packages will be discussed, which will enable you to hit the ground running when tackling your first decoupled project or using Django in the context of a hybrid architecture. Furthermore, we will discuss how web development has changed through the years, aiming to find the mindset that will keep Django (and by extension Python as a web development language) relevant in the future.


Carlos is a Pythonista and Django developer from Madrid, Spain. Though he wouldn't consider programming his vocational calling (probably music is), he loves open source and free software ever ince he has discovered it. That led him to be an occasional teacher and mentor, introducing rogramming and the hacker mindset to young people.

He believes, that real technological literacy, as opposed to technological consumerism, is integral to building a better society: developers are in a privileged position and openness, transparency and ease of access are fundamental. Communities play a vital role here: programming can be a cold, lonely and dehumanized enterprise, but in communities we can find warmth and meaning.

This year he spoke at DjangoCon Europe, where he delivered a speech in the hope of being useful and giving a glimpse of his own experiences with Django. Currently he works for a small data analysis and intelligence start-up as the lead developer, which is quite a challenge, but a learning experience with every step.

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